“We are part of Nature as a whole whose order we follow”
- Baruch Spinoza

We are part of Nature as a whole whose order we follow

- Baruch Spinoza

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sci-universe:

Different views of The Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA), the largest astronomical project in existence. It’s an international partnership of Europe, North America and East Asia in cooperation with the Republic of Chile, composing initially of 66 high precision antennas located in northern Chile.

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From Earth to Observable Universe

“Since, in the long run, every planetary civilization will be endangered by impacts from space, every surviving civilization is obliged to become spacefaring—not because of exploratory or romantic zeal, but for the most practical reason imaginable: staying alive… If our long-term survival is at stake, we have a basic responsibility to our species to venture to other worlds.” 

― Carl Sagan (Astrophysicist, Astronomer & Cosmologist)
(Full: Click Here)

From Earth to Observable Universe

“Since, in the long run, every planetary civilization will be endangered by impacts from space, every surviving civilization is obliged to become spacefaring—not because of exploratory or romantic zeal, but for the most practical reason imaginable: staying alive… If our long-term survival is at stake, we have a basic responsibility to our species to venture to other worlds.” 

― Carl Sagan (Astrophysicist, Astronomer & Cosmologist)

(Full: Click Here)

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Nebula Sh2-239

The cosmic brush of star formation composed this alluring mix of dust and dark nebulae. Cataloged as Sh2-239 and LDN 1551, the region lies near the southern end of the Taurus molecular cloud complex some 450 light-years distant. Stretching for nearly 3 light-years, the canvas abounds with signs of embedded young stellar objects driving dynamic outflows into the surrounding medium. Included near the center of the frame, a compact, tell-tale red jet of shocked hydrogen gas is near the position of infrared source IRS5, known to be a system of protostars surrounded by dust disks. Just below it are the broader, brighter wings of HH 102, one of the region’s many Herbig-Haro objects, nebulosities associated with newly born stars. Estimates indicate that the star forming LDN 1551 region contains a total amount of material equivalent to about 50 times the mass of the Sun.

Credit: T.A. Rector (University of Alaska Anchorage) and H. Schweiker (WIYN and NOAO/AURA/NSF)

Nebula Sh2-239

The cosmic brush of star formation composed this alluring mix of dust and dark nebulae. Cataloged as Sh2-239 and LDN 1551, the region lies near the southern end of the Taurus molecular cloud complex some 450 light-years distant. Stretching for nearly 3 light-years, the canvas abounds with signs of embedded young stellar objects driving dynamic outflows into the surrounding medium. Included near the center of the frame, a compact, tell-tale red jet of shocked hydrogen gas is near the position of infrared source IRS5, known to be a system of protostars surrounded by dust disks. Just below it are the broader, brighter wings of HH 102, one of the region’s many Herbig-Haro objects, nebulosities associated with newly born stars. Estimates indicate that the star forming LDN 1551 region contains a total amount of material equivalent to about 50 times the mass of the Sun.

Credit: T.A. Rector (University of Alaska Anchorage) and H. Schweiker (WIYN and NOAO/AURA/NSF)

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This is roughly the view of our neighbouring brightest galaxies if you were 20 million light years away from ‘home’ (red dot). A closer view reveals the closest neighbours as well. In a very small distance there are two galaxies surrounding the Milky Way, the Large and the Small Mangelanic Clouds.

Created by 3D map with Mathematica.
Data collected from Atlas of the universe

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SDO’s Ultra-high Definition View of 2012 Venus Transit Launched on Feb. 11, 2010, the Solar Dynamics Observatory, or SDO, is the most advanced spacecraft ever designed to study the sun.

During its five-year mission, it will examine the sun’s atmosphere, magnetic field and also provide a better understanding of the role the sun plays in Earth’s atmospheric chemistry and climate.


SDO provides images with resolution 8 times better than high-definition television and returns more than a terabyte of data each day. On June 5 2012, SDO collected images of the rarest predictable solar event—the transit of Venus across the face of the sun. This event happens in pairs eight years apart that are separated from each other by 105 or 121 years. The last transit was in 2004 and the next will not happen until 2117.


Credit: NASA

SDO’s Ultra-high Definition View of 2012 Venus Transit Launched on Feb. 11, 2010, the Solar Dynamics Observatory, or SDO, is the most advanced spacecraft ever designed to study the sun.

During its five-year mission, it will examine the sun’s atmosphere, magnetic field and also provide a better understanding of the role the sun plays in Earth’s atmospheric chemistry and climate.

SDO provides images with resolution 8 times better than high-definition television and returns more than a terabyte of data each day. On June 5 2012, SDO collected images of the rarest predictable solar event—the transit of Venus across the face of the sun. This event happens in pairs eight years apart that are separated from each other by 105 or 121 years. The last transit was in 2004 and the next will not happen until 2117.

Credit: NASA

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Planetary nebula NGC 5189 captured by Hubble’s Wide Field Camera 3 on July 6, 2012

• Credit: NASA, ESA, Hubble Heritage Team (STScl/AURA)

Planetary nebula NGC 5189 captured by Hubble’s Wide Field Camera 3 on July 6, 2012

• Credit: NASA, ESA, Hubble Heritage Team (STScl/AURA)

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NASA Space Shuttle Launch.

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